Great Ideas for an Apartment Garden

If you live in a small apartment unit, chances are having a garden isn’t on the list of your priorities. However, studies have shown just how therapeutic a garden can be to one’s daily life (even just a pocket-sized one). So don’t fret about not having enough space outdoors for shrubs, trees, and full blooms – not when there are several small garden ideas you can try right now.

Build a wall, then fill it with plants

If you want more privacy, go ahead and build a wooden divider between your unit and the next one’s (make sure you follow fencing regulations, though). You can then soften the effect with plants in containers. Even recycled wood can have a deliberately rustic appeal with potted plants hanging from hooks on the wall, or growing from crate-like planters in tiers or shelves built on its side. If you have a patio, even better! You can hold gatherings on squashy cushions on rugs, surrounded by herbs or potted blooms interspersed with fairy lights.

Think small, but colorful

Sometimes a burst of bright colors is enough to summon the sights and scents of nature without going overboard on the plants. All you need are hardy blooms like dwarf roses and geraniums, some pots, and sunlight for at least the fourth of a day. Group these blooms on an outdoor table or any surface that needs brightening up, and you’ll soon forget about not having a full-sized lawn.

Window boxes work wonders

If you don’t have horizontal space for plants, take advantage of your vertical ones. Just like the divider/fence idea above, the space underneath your windows can become prime real estate for your apartment garden. There is also the option of hanging baskets or burlap sacks of plants on balcony railings. You can plant an herb garden of basil, thyme, mint, cilantro, chiles, and even berries you can pick whenever you’re in the mood for them.

Create a whimsical vignette

Got orphaned teacups or teapots that no longer meet your tea party standards? Utilize them as whimsical plant holders! They can hold herbs, small flowers, wheat grass, or even tubers you’ve recycled from past meals. Artfully curate them in vignettes with other favorite objects throughout your apartment.  It won’t matter if the cups or pots are chipped or cracked a bit – it will add to the rustic and whimsical appeal of literally having a teacup-sized garden at home.

Go low-maintenance

If you don’t exactly have a green thumb, go for succulents. They’re some of the hardiest and most interesting-looking plants you can take care of. You don’t even need to water them on a regular basis because they store their own moisture supply within. Simply check the topsoil for dryness every week or so. What they need, though, is lots of sun. Make sure to place them somewhere they can bathe in full sunlight for most part of a day.   

 

Common Plant Diseases

common plant diseases  Common Plant Diseases

There are many diseases that can threaten your garden’s safety. Every good gardener must see to it that aside from giving his plants water, sun, and nutrients, diseases are kept at bay. Here are some of the most common types of plant diseases to look out for and how to treat them.

Blights

plants with blight

Leaves or branches that suddenly wither or brown and stop growing is a sign of a type of blight. It is bacterial disease that causes chlorosis or insufficient production of chlorophyll – causing the plant to die. The common types of blight include fire blight, alternaria blight or early blight, and phytophthora blight or late blight. Blights are common during humid weather or after a period of heavy rainfall. Once you spot these black-brown spots on your plants and leave begin to turn yellow, immediately remove and destroy affected leaves. They can be treated with fungicides and biofungicides but quickly become resistant to it-so treat fast and treat hard, ensuring all affected plants are treated. Ensure plants have good drainage and prevent overhead watering. Mulching with black plastic or rubber mulch prevents the fungus from spreading onto the leaves. You can also opt to use disease-resistant hybrids especially if blights are common in your area.

Cankers

Can be caused by bacteria, fungi or other organisms, cankers usually form on woody stems, causing them to wither and die. While some plants with cankers look similar to blight damage, but some cankers ooze, may look sunken and leaves lesions on tree barks. Man-made or natural wounds are the usual entry point for many fungal cankers and usually does not manifest until the plant or tree is under stress. There are cankers that aggressively affect some plants and have no cure. In cases like these, the entire plant must be removed to prevent nearby plants from being infected. To prevent cankers, use proper pruning techniques to only create small wounds so they can heal quickly. Do not prune during wet seasons as this is when cankers and other fungi are most active. Promote plant health and vigor by watering and properly, moderate fertilizing, and mulching- this way your plants have the ability to protect themselves from disease.

Rots

decaying tree trunk

These are diseases that decay part dog the plant. The rot can affect roots, stems, leaves, and even fruits –  leaving them soft and slimy or hard and dry. They can be caused by various types of bacteria or fungi. The best defense against rots are ensuring good drainage. Make sure the roots are completely dry before watering again. For already infected areas, make sure to remove and dispose them and apply compost tea or add beneficial bacteria to your soil.

Rusts

rusty plants

A powdery coating or a rust-colored coating is one of the easiest ways to identify plant rusts. These are kinds of fungi that attacks healthy and vigorous plants unlike other plant diseases that take advantage of weak plants. Rusts will take advantage of new sprouts, leaves and tender parts of a plant. Severe infection of rusts will cause stunted growth and yellowed or discolored leaves. For small infections, areas where pustules (orange, yellow, brown, black, or white spore producing structures) are visible must be removed and disposed.  Applying neem oil can kill spores on the leaves and is a good organic alternative to fungicides.

Wilts

wilting plants

Leaves wilt when they are not properly hydrated. In many cases, a small amount of wilt in between watering is healthy and prevents root rots. But when wilts continue to show even after replenishing your plant supply, your garden may be infected with fungi or bacteria that prevents your plant’s water conducting system from functioning properly. Some types of wilt like the verticillium wilt are very destructive and can stay in the soil for a long time. In many cases just removing infected areas may not work and it is better to completely remove the infected plat including the soil to prevent further damage to other plants. Do not use previously infected soil or include infected leaves to compost.

There are many diseases out there that may affect your plants. Your best defense is to make sure they are healthy so they have a chance to fight illnesses. Proper watering, good drainage, adequate sunlight, consistent pruning, mulching, and fertilizing at the right time will go a long way. It also helps to look out for certain disease-resistant crops to lower their chances of getting infected

 

Which Garden Bugs are Good for Your Garden?

lady beetle perched on a blade of grassYou have just begun your new garden, and the seedlings have begun to thrive and flourish. This is the time when bugs, pests and other organisms begin to inhabit the new ecosystem that is your garden. Some of them will want to harm your plants and you will want to take those out. But, there are also bugs that are beneficial and are necessary in helping your garden flourish while keeping away pests or diseases that may endanger your plants. Also, they can completely replace the use of pesticides.

Here are some friendly bugs that can help your garden, how they can help, and how to identify them:

Lady Beetle

download

 

Famous for their red trunk and black spots, this lovely bug is the easiest to spot and is one of the most beneficial garden pet you can have. Both adult and larvae ladybugs feed on aphids, mites, and other soft bodied bugs that may be invading your garden. An adult lady beetle can eat up to 50 aphids in one day! Ask your garden center or local gardening store if they are selling some.

Ground Beetle

black beetle

Similar to lady beetles, these nocturnal creatures feed on slugs, snails, insect eggs and larvae. They are quite easy to notice as they can grow as big as ¾ inch, can be dark blue/dark brown and have long legs. Invite them to your garden by providing ground covers like logs or stones.

Lacewings

lacewings

 

Characterized by their large wings that look wispy and lace-like, this garden bug is a voracious predator that devours aphids, moth eggs, small caterpillars, and scales. When they are not pouncing on garden pests, they do love nectar. Plant a few flowering plants around your garden to attract Lacewings.

Dragonfly

dragonfly

There are a number of species of dragonflies around the world. Their distinct four transparent wings, large eyes, and narrow body make them easy to spot. Aside from being very beautiful, dragonflies feed on mosquitoes, aphids and other pests that may be wandering around your garden. A pond, or any small body of water where they can deposit their larvae will surely attract dragonflies in your area.

Honeybees

honey bee

Probably one of the most important bugs to invite to your garden, they do one of the most important tasks, pollinate many of your plants. These buzzing garden friends are easily identified by their thick balls of yellow fuzzy pollen near their heads and their gold and black stripes. Encourage wild honey bees to visit your garden by growing flowering plants. Not only will you be getting a garden pollinator, you will also be helping the dwindling population of these busy workers grow their numbers

Learning which bugs can help your garden and how to introduce them to your crops are a healthier alternative to using pesticide that may harm you and your family in the long run. Check out your local gardening shop, odds are they have their own nursery for these helpful bugs or will have the resources needed to attract them to your garden.

 

Basic Gardening Tools

woman with basic gardening tools

Gardening can be beneficial in a number of ways. It’s therapeutic, meditative and brings us closer to Mother Nature. Some studies even show that getting your hands in the dirt can help boost the immune system.

 

The daunting part comes when you start getting the tools and products you need. “Will it be expensive?”, “What if I don’t have all the tools?” are some of the questions that make many soon-to-be-gardeners a little apprehensive. Some of us may have a limited amount of budget and that’s not a bad thing. Look at it this way, you can focus on the basics and build your way from there. With a limited budget in mind, here are 4 basic gardening tools that can help you get started.

Gardening Trowel

gardening trowel

One of the best multi-purpose tools that your garden can have. Usually a made with a forged blade with a wooden handle, this tool can be used to dig hard, rocky soil. The good thing about a good garden trowel is that it can double up as a shovel for small gardens, a weeder, and as a substitute for soil knives.  Look for pointy, scoop-shaped stainless steel blades that is sharp enough to function as a soil knife that is shaped well to sweep and gather soil properly.  

Gloves

 

Gardening without the proper equipment can leave you susceptible to allergens, bacteria and cuts from sharp rocks, thorns, or pointy foreign objects that may be in the soil. This makes a good pair of gardening gloves a good investment to keep your green hands safe. Look for a pair that is well knitted and lightweight. Leather is also a good material to look for as it helps provide a good grip.

gardening glovesFork

 

Another multi-purpose tool for the newbie gardener. A fork can work as an aerator and a soil cultivator. This also works great for mixing compost, wood chips, organic mulch and rubber mulch, wood chips, and manure. A smaller fork works best for small shrubs and flowerbeds. Looked for forged steel as they are stronger and more suitable for digging through compacted soil and hard rocks. This works hand in hand with your garden trowel.

Garden Shears

From pruning, trimming vines, cutting herbs, and even grass – just make sure to keep it clean in between uses. A good, lightweight pair of garden shears can go a long way. Sharp is the best trait your pruning shears can have. Sharp enough to create clean cut stems or vines to prevent diseases from infecting your plants. If you are suffering from arthritis, carpal tunnel or other physical ailments, many garden shears are designed with adjustable tensions and ergonomic grip to make the task easier.

 

Watering Can

watering can

A portable container with a spout is your best bet to make sure you water you plants deeply and evenly. The best part? You don’t necessary need to spend with this tool. All you need is some creativity to upcycle items that can be found at your home. You can piece hole on a used plastic bottle or recycle an old can and you’re set

That didn’t sound so expensive right? From there you can start building your tool collection as your garden grows. Looking for more tips to save on gardening? Here are 10 gardening hacks that can help without creating a huge dent on your wallet.

 

Vegetable Gardening Tips for Beginners

a bowl of vegetables

Vegetable Gardening Tips for Beginners

Growing your own vegetables can be very rewarding. You know exactly where your food is coming from, and you get them in their freshest state. Studies also show that horticulture can be very therapeutic. It is a great stress-reliever, improves mood, and overall mental health!

The best part? You do not need a green thumb or a backyard to get started. Here are a few tips to help you start your mini garden in with whatever space you have available.

Consider Indoor Gardening

The best part about bringing your plants inside is weather control. Prevent frost, too much sun or drowning your plants from harsh weather conditions by taking them in the comforts of your home. You can also benefit from the additional oxygen the vegetables produce.

Use Small Pots and Hanging Containers

These are great space-savers. Small pots are easy to move around, especially if you’re trying to give your plants more sunlight than your apartment could provide, while hanging containers take whatever free space you have above your head. If you have a wall in your house that is getting a lot of sun, look into installing a vertical garden and save the paint on that wall from fading from prolonged sun exposure.

Start with Plants that are Easy to Care For

Salad greens and lettuce are some of the easiest produce to grow and can still thrive even in partial shade.  Cherry tomatoes are small, flavorful, can grow in hanging containers. Cucumbers and other climbing vegetables will work great with vertical gardening. Once you’ve gained some confidence, you can try growing some strawberries in small pots or grow a variety of root crops like sweet potatoes, radishes or turnips in small buckets.

Use Good Quality Mulch

One of the challenges of indoor gardening is keeping the dirt in your pots and out of your living room floor. Constant watering and moving your plants around will erode and take out the nutrients in the container that your vegetables need to thrive. Mulching keeps all the dirt in place. While organic mulch are very cheap and easy to acquire, it decomposes quickly and some materials emit a sour smell that can spread in your house. Rubber mulch can help keep all the soil in place while matching your home décor. Make sure you invest in the high quality rubber mulch that has been stripped off of metal pieces and fine rubber particles.

Do not underwater/overwater your plants

This may be easy to overlook and is the usual culprit behind your nursery not providing a good harvest or worse: dying before they bear fruit. Water your plants at least once a week, more if the season is particularly dry and hot. A good rule of thumb is to lightly scratch the top of the soil, if it crumble give your vegetables a good watering. If it’s still moist, give it a day or two to absorb all the moisture in the soil.

Vegetable gardening can be truly satisfying without the need for a lot of space, equipment or experience. All you need to start is a lot of patience for trial and error and some TLC as you wait for harvest season. Happy Gardening!

Sources

http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/vgen/vegetable-gardening-for-beginners.htm

http://lifehacker.com/the-seven-easiest-vegetables-to-grow-for-beginner-garde-1562176780

http://www.gardeners.com/how-to/vegetable-gardening/5069.html?SC=XNET9454

http://www.tastefulgarden.com/store/pc/Vegetable-Gardening-for-Beginners-d27.htm

http://learn.eartheasy.com/2014/09/6-unexpected-health-benefits-of-gardening/

http://www.schultesgreenhouse.com/Benefits.html

http://ahta.org/news/benefits-gardening-and-food-growing-health-and-wellbeing

http://edition.cnn.com/2011/HEALTH/07/08/why.gardening.good/

 

Designing a Drought-Resistant Lawn

Sprout coming out of cracked concrete

 

Widespread drought has cast a dark shadow on the gardening community. In these times of water conservation, many homeowners and institutions have come under fire for using sprinklers or garden hoses to water their lawns. Lawn maintenance and caring for one’s garden are in danger of becoming wasteful activities.

Fortunately, there are ways to still have a beautiful garden and keep it thriving without using up too much water. You can opt to make it a DIY project, or consult a professional gardener to draw up a plan for your drought-resistant lawn. Either way, the secret is in keeping everything practical and low-maintenance while creating visual panache.

Create texture with rocks and plants  

A smooth, well-manicured lawn is impractical during a drought because it is difficult to maintain with minimal water supplies. It is also hard to hide dry and barren patches on a flat lawn. Go for a mixed-garden bed instead. You can make up for possible visual gaps in your lawn with different textures and shapes. Sandstone boulders and paving stones can be interspersed with tall native grasses that do not require constant watering – plus they can prevent erosion while allowing rainwater to hydrate the soil.

Install a drip-irrigation system

Drip irrigation system

This is an effective way to keep your plants directly hydrated without wasting water the way a sprinkler system does. A drip-irrigation system can be adjusted to suit the season so you can take advantage of moisture from the cold months.

Choose drought-tolerant plants

There are low-maintenance plants that only need irrigation once every couple of months. Some drought-tolerant shrubs, trees, evergreens, and perennials include yarrow, Spanish lavender, African daisies, bottlebrush, rockroses, juniper, myrtle, oleander, bougainvillea, yellow bells, aloe, all manner of cacti, and most native plants. Many of these examples have minimal to moderate watering needs, come in a variety of colorful blooms attractive to hummingbirds and bees, and feature gorgeous textures and scents.

Use mulch to keep moisture locked in

rubber mulch

Black Rubber Mulch

Mulching is an effective solution to keep moisture locked in the soil where it needs it most. Rubber mulch is particularly reliable at keeping the soil and plant roots hydrated because it doesn’t retain moisture itself. Just two inches of mulch spread out evenly between plants can keep temperatures even and foliage healthy and thriving.

Select garden ornaments that provide shade while beautifying

Stone or wooden benches, birdbaths, gazebos, and sculpted garden ornaments not only add drama to your lawn, but also much-needed shade for grass and flowers. Keep textures and shapes varied to heighten visual appeal. It’s also good to consider how these ornaments can catch rainwater for plants, the way sloping stones, fountains, and ponds do.

 

Resources:

http://www.sunset.com/garden/landscaping-design/drought-resistant-plants/drought-resistant-plants-lawn-alternative

http://www.sunset.com/garden/flowers-plants/water-wise-plants/low-water-plants

http://www.bhg.com/gardening/landscaping-projects/landscape-basics/drought-tolerant-landscaping-ideas/

 

How To Apply Mulch

landscape with rubbermulch

Whenever people talk about gardening basics, watering, fertilizing, and weeding instantly come to mind. Today, mulching has become an integral part of it. Its benefits go beyond prettifying a garden, because it offers significant reduction in weed presence, unparalleled moisture retention in soil, and keeping erosion at bay.

Of course, these benefits are present only if mulching is done right. If it’s your first time to mulch, here are some important steps to take.

First, choose the right mulch for your gardening needs. Some gardens need a lot of “movement”, as with vegetable patches and perennial plants. If the soil needs to be regularly composted, you will do best with organic mulches like grass, bark, and leaves. A semi-permanent gardening set-up can benefit from inorganic mulches like stone and shredded rubber.

It’s also a good idea to take weather conditions into consideration. For instance, windy days can blow away light pine needles, sawdust, and straw and make a mess instead of a neat garden.

Secondly, weed. Pull out all visible weeds, and take extra care not to scatter any spores from unwanted plants. Rake the area carefully, then spread a weed barrier over the soil to further prevent weeds from penetrating the mulch.

Next, calculate how much mulch you will need. You can avoid overspending or running out of mulch too soon. The appropriate mulch depth is at two inches, so if you’re mulching a six-feet by three-feet flower bed, you will need around three cubic feet of mulch.

Label newly-planted seeds. Use popsicle sticks with the names of the plants on them.This will keep your garden organized and easier to maintain should specific plants have special gardening needs. You would also want to avoid mulching over the seeds because they need space to grow.

watering plants

Then water all plants prior to mulching. All the plants, young or old, that you want to protect with mulch need to be watered before applying mulch on their bed. This is also the best time to add fertilizer.

Apply mulch carefully over the soil. Let the mulching begin! Take a trowel and carefully spread mulch in a two-inch depth over the weeded area. Take extra care not to pile up mulch at the base of plants because it can smother them. If mulching near fully grown trees, leave at least a diameter of three feet around the base mulch-free. If you want to smoothen out the mulch further, use a garden rake.

Now you have a garden that retains moisture and fertilizer in the soil and roots where it needs them most – and you won’t have to worry about replenishing mulch everyday!

Resources:

http://northcoastgardening.com/2009/06/organic-gardening-101-mulch/

http://www.bhg.com/gardening/yard/mulch/how-to-mulch/

http://homeguides.sfgate.com/lay-down-mulch-48172.html

 

Winter Uses for Rubber Mulch

snowy house and landscape

While others might find a blanket of snow on their gardens invigorating and fresh, many will likely associate it with back-breaking shoveling, allergies, and overall despair at the thought of slipping and sliding on snow – or of their precious plants dying in that icy onslaught. The good news is that rubber mulch has winter-time benefits, too.

Brighten up your landscape

Brightly colored rubber mulch can jazz up your winter landscaping with a myriad of colors you associate with your favorite season. Feel like extending summer or spring indefinitely? The cheery reds and yellows mixed with the vibrant greens of a rubber mulch pallet can recall a blooming, sunny garden even in the midst of a blizzard. Rustic browns and orange accents can summon autumn. The possibilities are as limitless as your imagination and creativity allow them to be.

Slip-proof your walkways

Rubber mulch offers the kind of traction that is beneficial if you have outdoor walkways and footpaths you frequently use. If you have bare, slippery walkways that will likely get rained or snowed on, you can introduce rubber mulch to them as early as fall. Doing this will make walking outdoors practically accident-free.

Battle garden molds and mildew

Unlike organic mulches, shredded rubber will discourage molds and mildew from wreaking havoc in your winter garden. Because it doesn’t decay or decompose, you won’t have to spend your winter holidays worrying how your garden will look after all that snow has melted. Also, rubber actually discourages weed germination.

Keep your plants disease-free

One unpleasant activity which winter can inherit from a careless autumn season is raking leaves. While the russets, golden-browns,and reddish-orange hues of fall are alluring, the leaves and foliage making up this palette can mean a soaked mat of potential diseases for your precious winter plants. If you’ve been a tad neglectful about raking fallen leaves, rubber mulch can be your friend. Occasional raking is all it needs to avoid contaminating your plants with fungi and diseases, or suffocating your lawn grass (something un-raked organic mulches tend to do).

The moody greys and off-whites of winter can make any garden or landscape (and anyone gazing at it) sad. Seasonal affective disorder is real, and a lot of it has to do with the mood-influencing sights, sounds, and sensations of cold weather. Fret not, because rubber mulch can save the (wintry) days in its own simple ways!

How to Have a Beautiful Winter Garden

brown banner with text on it

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas…and nowhere else is this more obvious than in your garden! ‘Tis the season to get chilly, but wintertime can also become a picturesque backdrop for memorable gatherings when done right.

 

Echo outdoor winter elements in your interior decor

 

Plan your get-togethers in winter carefully by coordinating details inside and outside the house. It will make your home look harmonious and welcoming. If you aren’t big on the usual Yuletide palette (bright red, green, and gold), patterns (plaids and doilies), and decor (Christmas ornaments), you can play around with color, texture, and other details of winter instead. Take inspiration from your own garden to make your interiors just as lovely as nature makes the outdoors.

Stick to a minimalist winter palette such as pale blues, silvers, and whites for big elements like rugs, curtains, and pillow covers. Consider snowflake patterns or fluffy fabrics to echo snow. Then add a few pops of winter-inspired color from your garden- the bright red of berries or poinsettia, the green of fir, or the burnished gold of pine cones- with accessories and small decorative touches all over the place.

 

Highlight the qualities of winter blooms and trees

 

Wintertime may not wear as colorful and vibrant a cloak as autumn, but with a few well-chosen plants, it can be equally as gorgeous. The key is to work not just with visuals, but with the other senses, as well. For instance, the boldly-textured bark of silver birch and cherry trees can add a tactile element to your garden. You can wrap fairy lights on their trunks or drape paper lanterns on their branches to highlight them.

Another trick to having a beautiful winter garden is to make it obvious that you have one even if it’s covered in snow. How to do this? Select aromatic plants! Jasmine, daphne, gardenias, and Stargazer lilies give off exquisite scents especially in the clean, crisp air of winter because they are not competing with the aromas of spring or summertime.

 

Create cozy corners

 

Bring out the flickering tea lights in glass containers or floating candles in their vessels, because nothing can cozy up your home more than winter and a warm glowing nook. Those unlit corners of your patio, porch, or gazebo  will give off a welcoming glow with a bit of candlelight (consider LED tea lights if you’re worried about open flames). If it gets too cold to appreciate your winter garden outdoors, view it through a fairy lights-framed window seat instead.

 

Prettify your pathways (while making them slip-proof)

 

Outdoor safety can be a thing of beauty, too. You can line up your pathways with landscape lights so you won’t slip or trip on anything going home. Choose prettily shaped LED path lights or solar powered ones if there’s enough sunlight to charge them – this way, even if they are on all night, you won’t have to worry about high electric bills.

While you’re at it, consider lining your paths with rubber mulch. It won’t freeze in cold weather because it doesn’t absorb water, and because it’s made of rubber, will provide enough traction as you walk confidently through your winter garden.

 


Resources:

http://www.saga.co.uk/magazine/home-garden/gardening/ideas/how-to-create-a-beautiful-winter-garden

http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/garden/516804/How-to-create-your-own-spectacular-winter-garden

http://www.thedailynewsonline.com/bdn05/master-gardener-try-these-fragrant-flowers-for-christmas-20151208

 

 

Termite Home Invasion Timeline

everlast termite

  • Termite Invasion Timeline

Swarming

  1.      Termites turn into larger, sexually mature “swarmers” with wing buds.
  2.      Swarmers leave the nest by flying through mud tubes.
  3.      These mud tubes connect underground colonies to food sources such as wood materials in houses.
  4.      Termites called supplementary reproductives “back-up” the primary queen by producing extra eggs & expanding the colony’s foraging territory.
  5.      If the colony queen dies or if a part of the colony is isolated from the queen, supplementary reproductives take on the role of the queen.
  6.      As a colony increases in size, foragers form satellite colonies: They create tunnel systems in the soil.
  7.      These tunnels connect colonies to food sources such wood materials in houses.

Budding

Not-So-Fun-Facts

  •         Termites swarm throughout the warm season, but not as much as during springtime.
  •         Colonies may swarm multiple times. Later swarms do not match the intensity of the first swarm.
  •         Subterranean termites swarm during the day, although Formosan termites (a species of subterranean termite) swarm at night.
  •         Swarm flights are brief, aided by prevailing winds.
  •         Winged termites do not fly too far but can be carried great distances by strong wind.

3 ways to get rid of termites…

  1.   Set up a cardboard trap.

Take a couple flat strips of cardboard, wet them, and stack them on one another in an area where termites are likely to be. Because termites feed on cellulose (cardboard), this makes for an excellent spot trap. When the cardboard is infested with termites, take it out in a safe area and burn it. Repeat multiple times, if necessary.

  1.   Try beneficial nematodes.

Beneficial nematodes are small unsegmented worm species that are natural parasites to garden pests, including termites. These nematodes search for hosts, such as termite larvae, and burrow into them, usually causing death within 48 hours.

  1.      Use rubber in lieu of wood mulch. Zero food source=zero termites.

http://thebugskiller.com/termite-infestation-detection-solution-and-prevention-tips/

http://www.nytimes.com/1996/05/26/realestate/your-home-coming-to-terms-with-termites.html

http://www.termites101.org/termite-basics/colonies