Five Different Types of Gardening

balcony garden

Gardens can be as unique as a person’s fingerprint – from the typical backyard vegetable plots to the manicured gardens of Versailles. They’re born out of different needs: beautification, as food source, for recreational pursuits, and others.

Gardens are as diverse in looks as they are in purpose, as evidenced by the following different types of gardening. Which one is for you?

Vertical

This kind of garden uses not just the plant beds and horizontal surfaces of a yard, but also its walls and other vertical spaces. Vertical gardening is popular among those who don’t have space for a full garden, like apartment dwellers. It also allows a creative way to enjoy the benefits of a perennial garden while beautifying an unattractive wall or fence.

A vertical garden usually has a frame to hold the fabric layer, the plants, and the garden’s entire irrigation system. Many homes are employing this space-saving technique to gardening, but a lot of public spaces like building facades and the walls of parks and thoroughfares also showcase it.  

Container

Tiled patios, wooden porches, and other surfaces that can’t accommodate vegetable plots and flower beds are well-suited for container gardening. Containers can range from plastic to ceramic pots, and even organic vessels like coconut husks and eggshell halves. It’s the garden type of choice for many beginning gardeners, or those who want to grow a select group of plants, like herbs or blooms.

Raised plant beds framed by wood, plastic, stone, or rubber borders also fall under the container gardening category. Those who prefer their outdoor garden space to feature landscaping elements and wish to segregate their vegetable, herb, or curated plants use this technique to mark them off as separate from the ornamentals.

Indoor

This type of gardening has become an integral part of interior decorating in the same way landscaping has with outdoor design. Many homes have incorporated “indoor-friendly” plants in their living spaces to help purify the air, add a touch of nature, and also as statement pieces.

On a more practical note, windowsill gardening and plants grown on a dedicated ledge, table, bench, or counter help supply kitchen pantries while keeping the temperature even for the plants no matter what the season is. Some plants need to have their seeds sown and take root indoors before being transplanted outside, as they can be too fragile for chilly or hot weather, or could develop rot quickly if unsupervised.

Water

Water gardening combines decorative and botanical elements to create a whimsical touch to exterior and interior spaces. Ponds, fountains, and tanks are some popular examples of this type. Those who want their water garden to be permanent have it integrated in their outdoor design by a contractor, as with constructions of elaborate ponds and waterfall features. However, a tub or a tank will work fine on porches, patios, and other outdoor spaces, as well.

The secret to a successful water garden is to make it look as natural as possible. The water also has to be protected from freeze, algae, and pests. Popular plants for water gardening include many types of water lilies and lotus, hyacinth, duckweed, and other floating types.

Community

A community garden is a single piece of land tended to by different people. They are often found in special sections of public parks and other spaces, or in the middle of an apartment complex or shared living facility. Its main purpose is to bring people together through cooperation and the shared benefits of a garden – whether it’s the beautification of a public space, for social gatherings, or to share the “fruits” of a harvest together.

Vegetable and fruit gardens are popular for community gardening because people can see just how successfully they’ve grown their own food. Flower gardens are ideal for quiet spaces like parks, hospitals, libraries, and other public spaces where people come to sit and think. Community gardens bring people together and give them a sense of purpose and pride, which is why many local cause-oriented groups include them in their list of projects.

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